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Agent Corner

The Villages Health Chief Medical Officer Jeff Lowenkron answers important COVID-19 questions

The Villages Daily Sun featured an article about the COVID-19 pandemic and testing in the state of Florida. The Villages Health Chief Medical Officer, Jeff Lowenkron, was interviewed and provided some great insight on testing, medications to treat hospitalized patients, where to get a test, antibody testing and more.

Read the Daily Sun Article


The Villages Health is Hiring to Accommodate Practice & Community Expansion

The Villages Daily Sun featured The Villages Health in a recent article on growing healthcare demands. The Villages Health is looking to hire qualified healthcare providers to help meet the demands of a rapidly expanding patient population.

Read the Daily Sun Article


The Villages Health Announces New Primary Care Center in Lake Deaton Plaza

As The Villages® Community continues to welcome new neighbors, The Villages Health announced plans to expand primary care services to a new location in Lake Deaton Plaza – just a 10-minute drive from the Center for Advanced Healthcare at Brownwood.

Read the Daily Sun Article


OneBlood, serving The Villages® & Central Florida Now Testing for COVID-19 Antibodies

The blood bank serving The Villages® and other parts of Central Florida is now testing all donor blood for COVID-19 antibodies. Potential donors are encouraged to contribute to help researchers find answers on possible immunity.

Read the Daily Sun Article


Telemedicine Popularity on the Rise During COVID-19 Pandemic

The demand for telemedicine and telehealth services has exploded in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Ashley Wood, medical director at The Villages Health Creekside Care Center was recently featured in The Villages Daily Sun for providing telehealth services.

Read the Daily Sun Article


Physical Fitness During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Each year, our nation celebrates National Physical Fitness and Sports Month in May. This year is no exception, but it does hold some new challenges amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Experts agree regular physical exercise has a profound and positive impact on our immune system and benefits both the mind and body.

How can you and your clients accomplish your physical exercise goals and regimens during a time when access to gyms and parks are restricted? With some simple adjustments and determination, it’s still possible. These suggestions are only intended for individuals without any symptoms or diagnosis of respiratory illness and should not replace medical guidance in case of any health condition.

Indoor Exercise

A more sedentary lifestyle can have negative effects on our physical and mental health and overall quality of life. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adults aged 18 and over do a total of at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activities throughout the week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity physical activity throughout the week. This should include strengthening activities at least two days per week.

For older adults with poor mobility, three or more days of physical activity to enhance balance and prevent falls is suggested. You can follow the five elements of fitness from almost any area of your home:

  • Warmup. This can be as simple as walking around your house at a steady pace, on a treadmill or at a slow pace on a stationary bike. These activities prepare your body for a more vigorous activity and help prevent injury.
  • Cardiovascular. Try “high knee” exercise, which is essentially running in place. Stand with your legs together and arms at your sides. Lift one knee toward your chest. Lower your leg and repeat with the other knee. Continue alternating knees, pumping your arms up and down. Other ideas include jumping rope or even dancing to your favorite tunes! Try an exercise video or pedal faster if you have a stationary bike.
  • Resistance. Strength-building exercises not only build muscle and increase bone density, but help your body burn more calories and can even boost your mood. Some good indoor strength-building exercises include push-ups, crunches, and squats; working with dumbbells or bands.
  • Flexibility. Stretching allows for easier movement and helps give your muscles and joints a greater range of motion, improved balance and increased balance. Some ideas for this training include neck stretches, shoulder stretches, hamstring stretches, glutes stretches and more. Work in some stretch routines that target the areas of your body you would like to be more flexible.
  • Cooldown. The cool-down portion of a workout routine is designed to reduce your heart and breathing rates and gradually cool your body temperature. It can also reduce muscle soreness and stiffness and prevent venous pooling of blood in the lower extremities, which can cause dizziness. To cool down, you can walk around your home, stretch out your legs, stretch your chest, or do some slow-paced jumping jacks.

Remember, any physical activity is better than none. Start slow and increase duration, frequency and intensity over time. During this time of COVID-19, even short amounts of activity at a time can make a difference. Over the course of a week, you’ll be surprised how much you’ve accomplished. Even cleaning and gardening help you stay active and flexible.

Register for a Learning Center Class Today

Register


Physical Fitness During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Each year, our nation celebrates National Physical Fitness and Sports Month in May. This year is no exception, but it does hold some new challenges amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Experts agree regular physical exercise has a profound and positive impact on our immune system and benefits both the mind and body.

How can you accomplish your physical exercise goals and regimens during a time when access to gyms and parks are restricted? With some simple adjustments and determination, it’s still possible. These suggestions are only intended for individuals without any symptoms or diagnosis of respiratory illness and should not replace medical guidance in case of any health condition.

Indoor Exercise

A more sedentary lifestyle can have negative effects on our physical and mental health and overall quality of life. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adults aged 18 and over do a total of at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activities throughout the week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity physical activity throughout the week. This should include strengthening activities at least two days per week.

For older adults with poor mobility, three or more days of physical activity to enhance balance and prevent falls is suggested. You can follow the five elements of fitness from almost any area of your home:

  • Warmup. This can be as simple as walking around your house at a steady pace, on a treadmill or at a slow pace on a stationary bike. These activities prepare your body for a more vigorous activity and help prevent injury.
  • Cardiovascular. Try “high knee” exercise, which is essentially running in place. Stand with your legs together and arms at your sides. Lift one knee toward your chest. Lower your leg and repeat with the other knee. Continue alternating knees, pumping your arms up and down. Other ideas include jumping rope or even dancing to your favorite tunes! Try an exercise video or pedal faster if you have a stationary bike.
  • Resistance. Strength-building exercises not only build muscle and increase bone density, but help your body burn more calories and can even boost your mood. Some good indoor strength-building exercises include push-ups, crunches, and squats; working with dumbbells or bands.
  • Flexibility. Stretching allows for easier movement and helps give your muscles and joints a greater range of motion, improved balance and increased balance. Some ideas for this training include neck stretches, shoulder stretches, hamstring stretches, glutes stretches and more. Work in some stretch routines that target the areas of your body you would like to be more flexible.
  • Cooldown. The cool-down portion of a workout routine is designed to reduce your heart and breathing rates and gradually cool your body temperature. It can also reduce muscle soreness and stiffness and prevent venous pooling of blood in the lower extremities, which can cause dizziness. To cool down, you can walk around your home, stretch out your legs, stretch your chest, or do some slow-paced jumping jacks.

Remember, any physical activity is better than none. Start slow and increase duration, frequency and intensity over time. During this time of COVID-19, even short amounts of activity at a time can make a difference. Over the course of a week, you’ll be surprised how much you’ve accomplished. Even cleaning and gardening help you stay active and flexible.

Register for a Learning Center Class Today

Register


Resources from Florida Department of Health – Coronavirus (COVID-19)

For up-to-date information related to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Florida, we recommend visiting the Florida Department of Health website.

Coronavirus Cases in Florida Live Dashboard

See where the Coronavirus (COVID-19) is developing, county by county, in Florida.

General Prevention

Tips on how to prevent the spread of the Conoravirus in general.

Caring for Older Adults

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, older adults may have a greater chance for serious illness from COVID-19—especially people with weak immune systems or underlying chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, diabetes or kidney disease.

Should I get Tested?

Have you been in close contact with someone who has recently returned from international travel or a cruise and has any of the symptoms of Coronavirus?

Protect Yourself in Crowds

Limit group interactions if you are 65 or older and have underlying or chronic health conditions, compromised immunity, diabetes or heart or lung disease.

Social Distancing

Social distancing measures are taken to restrict when and where people can gather to stop or slow the spread of infectious diseases. Social distancing measures include limiting large groups of people coming together, closing buildings and canceling events.


How to Eat Healthy During a Hurricane

Sara Murray, RD, LDN, one of our Registered Dietitians, has prepared a grocery shopping list, several recipes and a meal plan for you and your family in case of an emergency. The shopping list includes food for 3-days for a family of 4. Below you will also find an example of a 3-day meal plan incorporating these recipes. We hope you find these resources helpful!

Hurricane Grocery List

Recipes

Now that you have all of your groceries, it’s time to make healthy recipes out of those ingredients. You can download the recipes by pressing the button below.

Meal Plan

Below you can find an example of a 3-day meal plan incorporating the recipes above.


Reverse Aging

As a society, we are fascinated by remedies and quick fixes that promise to slow the aging process so we can live longer, healthier lives. But what if you could do more than just slow the aging process? What if you could start to reverse it?

One of the most promising methodologies includes the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Dr. Shai Efrati, Director of the Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research in Israel, explored the concept of reverse aging. On July 2nd at the Lake Miona Regional Recreation Center in The Villages, Florida, he shared results from clinical studies conducted by his team demonstrating that the regeneration of brain tissue, and other important capabilities, is indeed possible.

Speaker:
Professor Shai Efrati, MD

    • Director of the Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel.
    • Director of the Research & Development unit, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel.
    • Associate professor at the Sackler School of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University.
    • Chairmen of the Israeli Society for Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine (ISDHM).

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My first appointment with Dr. Cloukey lasted an hour and we instantly made a personal connection.

Joe Finch, Patient at Pinellas Care Center